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Archive for June, 2017

William Eggleston Portraits

Friday, June 30th, 2017

William Eggleston once told the author Mark Holborn, “I am at war with the obvious.” The obvious, or the mundane, are hallmarks of Eggleston’s contribution to the art of colour photography.

Yet, I’ve never really appreciated a lot of those pictures that Eggleston has made around his home town of Memphis, Tennessee. A well-off white privileged male making pictures of neon signs and ordinary life with expensive (to me) Leica film cameras. In that regard, I’m a bit like anybody with the uneducated taste for pictures of the mundane. I’ve always thought of most Eggleston photographs as good pictures of nothing much. And of Eggleston as “just that rich eccentric guy from Memphis” with his cliche Southern accent.

However, when Eggleston makes a good picture it can be a bloody good picture. It is difficult to appreciate a photographer’s work from the low resolution images found on blogs and gallery websites, or even reading their books – there is really no experience like going into art galleries and looking at them within the mundane environment.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Gamber’s Fallacy & The Hot Hand Fallacy

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

The Gambler’s Fallacy and the Hot Hand Fallacy are two poles of the same flawed paradigm. They are reverse images of the tendency for our brain to believe in a storied, or patterned, outcome. As opposed to the probabilistic reality that individual events may have zero bearing on the preceding or following events. They are human biases.

The Gambler’s Fallacy

The Gambler’s Fallacy says that the longer you sit at a slot machine or roll a dice, events with entirely unrelated outcomes, the chances of winning increase. In the classic description of the Gambler’s Fallacy the player believes that if a coin has flipped three heads, the chances are increased that on the next go it is inclined to flip a tail. It’s the idea that averages even out the odds. But, unfortunately for the gambler, each toss of a coin is entirely independent of probabilistic outcome and there is just as much a reason to expect a head or a tail at 50/50 odds after 10,000 coin flips of heads.

The number of preceding outcomes has no relationship to the next. Read the rest of this entry »

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About the Author

Steven Clark Steven Clark - the stand up guy on this site

My name is Steven Clark (aka nortypig) and I live in Southern Tasmania. I have an MBA (Specialisation) and a Bachelor of Computing from the University of Tasmania. I'm a photographer making pictures with film. A web developer for money. A business consultant for fun. A journalist on paper. Dreams of owning the World. Idea champion. Paradox. Life partner to Megan.

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