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Archive for the 'history' Category

My Father & a Friend Smoking Tobacco (circa 1950)

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

My father was a working man. He left school at the end of Grade 6 to help support his large impoverished family and I have a lot of respect for that. This photograph was scanned from a 6cm x 9cm film negative made by my paternal grandmother Elvie Ruth Bonner (1901-1986). My father is the guy on the right with a cigarette and I’m not sure who the other guy was to him or why my grandmother made this photograph. The date would have been very close to 1950.

Longitude (Book Review)

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Longitude by Dava Sobel

The sailor in my bones called out to read Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of his Time by Dava Sobel. The longitude problem had plagued seafaring civilisations since Ptolemy. It was a scientific problem that eluded answers until, in 1773, an Englishman named John Harrison, after forty years of experimentation, development and political warfare, claimed the 20,000 pound reward put forward by the Longitude Act 1714. This was the pressing scientific question of the age.

Consider the scientific simplicity of the latitude problem that can be understood through cosmic cycles including the length of a day or the height of the sun or by identifying known stars above the horizon. Latitude is a series of concentric circles that include the Equator where the Sun passes closest to the Earth and the tropics of Capricorn and Cancer that respectively mark the sun’s extremes of journey from Southern-most-to-Northern-most traverse. Latitudes are a series of parallel lines around the planet. Any sailor could know their latitude, how high up or low down a parallel line they were traversing, because latitude is fixed by the laws of nature. But consider the complexity of determining longitude.

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Old Film:: My Dad & National Service (early 1950s)

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

My father served his 176 days in National Service during the very early 1950s. He didn’t like the discipline. And until I looked at his hair in these photographs I hadn’t realised the military allowed swag hair back in the day. These photographs were scanned from 6cm x 9cm film negatives made by my grandmother Elvie Ruth Bonner (1901-1986). My parents married around this time. Mum was a trained nurse and my father was a labourer. He ended up working at Comalco’s Bell Bay plant for over forty years and died in 2000 from chronic lung disease.

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About the Author

Steven Clark Steven Clark - the stand up guy on this site

My name is Steven Clark (aka nortypig) and I live in Southern Tasmania. I have an MBA (Specialisation) and a Bachelor of Computing from the University of Tasmania. I'm a photographer making pictures with film. A web developer for money. A business consultant for fun. A journalist on paper. Dreams of owning the World. Idea champion. Paradox. Life partner to Megan.

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